Accordion-folded book, 3 × 12in. A fifty-foot long timeline with four dates: the date the Earth formed (ca. 4.5 billion years ago), the date of the earliest sign life on Earth (ca. 3.7 billion years ago), the date of the earliest remains of anatomically modern humans (ca. 195,000 years ago), and my birthday.

 
 
 
 
 
 

Ambicons is a card game designed for undergraduate design students.

There are three kinds of cards: symbol cards, concept cards (single or contrasting pair), and modifier cards. After dealing symbol cards to players the dealer turns over a concept card. Players use as many or as few symbols in their hand to represent that concept. A modifier cards might require players to use only one symbol, to incorporate a shared symbol drawn from the unused symbols stack, or to propose two separate solutions. Players then argue for their choice to the dealer, who chooses the best option.

The game rewards imagination, conceptual flexibility, and the ability to articulate reasons for one’s choices. The point is to help students get over proximity biases and rigidity in design problem-solving.

Cornered, a prototype for an original game I created in February/March 2013. Players use the die to set their first pieces, then take turns setting subsequent pieces until one player can no longer make a legal play.

 
 
 

Personal project; book covers. I first encountered Friedrich Dürrenmatt’s writings by way of his play Die Physiker (The Physicists), given to me by a neighbor when I went to Bonn, (then West) Germany in 1985 as an exchange student. Dürrenmatt is a sly commentator on the human condition; he’s also tremendously funny. If you read only one play of his, make it Der Besuch der Alten Dame (usually translated The Visit). 6 × 9in.

 
 
 

The last program I did for APT. Talk about a great place to throw a conference. And I was happy that people seemed to agree that an accordion-folded program was not a bad idea. 36 × 11in folded to 6 × 11in.

 
 
 

One of a series of conference programs I made for the Association for Political Theory. This one I designed while also serving as one of the program committee co-chairs. The downside was that I was designing and getting this produced remotely—I was in Champaign, IL, and the conference was in College Station, TX—while also putting together a conference program with over one hundred papers and presenters, panel chairs and discussants, and plenary speakers, with all the attendant headaches about venues, dropouts, late papers, and so on. The upside was that I didn’t have to wait long for updates and changes that needed making. 7.3 × 9.5in, folded.