kast_solids_4

Counting 65025–65536 in Kast, the last part of the design space.


kast_solids_3

Counting 1025–1536 in Kast.


kast_solids_2

Counting 513–1024 in the Kast design space, using the same code as in my previous post.


kast_solids

Counting 0–512 in the Kast design space. (I’ve noted before that the space can handle counts up to 65535, but sadly, my system memory isn’t as accommodating.) In this version, the Python code uses fills and strokes to indicate continuous solids and faces. Two weeks of (non-continuous!) work later, with lots of coffee, writing, drawing, and using paper cubes to model the steps the code was making along the way, it’s done. And the model behind the code is generalizable, so I could generate counts for an n × n × n design space.

This branch of my ongoing Kast project was inspired by seeing images of SPIN Studio’s Concrete Outline on the mylar slipcover of their first issue of Adventures In Typography (published by Unit Editions). I thought it should be possible to write code to make forms like those, and I had a project ready to try it out on.

The point of this coding—besides learning Python and making interesting images—is ultimately to plan further paper and rendering projects. The code will let me model quickly all the possibilities for the design spaces I have in mind.


kast_explained

First cut at an explanation for Kast, the typeface system behind all those paper photos I’ve posted.


kast_counting

Counting 0–512 in binary with Kast’s design space. Kast’s letterforms are based on the isometric projection of shaded virtual cubes stacked on a 3d grid with 2 × 2 × 4 = 16 cells. I’m using Python to map and document all the possible configurations of cubes in the grid (‘physically’ possible and impossible alike) by counting through the grid in binary (a cube can be absent=0 or present=1 at each position in the grid). I’ll eventually print the configurations and use what I learn from the process and documentation to plan paper and digitally-rendered constructions.


17 01 15

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week18

17 01 08

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week17

17 01 01

 
 
 

kast_week16

16 12 25

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week15

16 12 18

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week14

16 12 11

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week13

16 12 04

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

kast_week12

16 11 27

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

cuts_counting_kast_week11

16 11 20

cuts_25_x

counting_base6 _proto (1, 2, 3)

counting_base6 _proto (4, 5, 0)

kast_a_proto

kast_b_proto

kast_c_proto

kast_c_proto (redux)

kast_d_proto

kast_d_proto (redux)

kast_e_proto

kast_e_proto (redux shadow)


cuts_week10

16 11 13

cuts_18_x

cuts_18a_x

cuts_19_x

cuts_20_x

cuts_21_x (I am not stopping)

cuts_22_x

cuts_23_x

cuts_24_x


cuts_week9

16 11 06

cuts_11_x

cuts_12_x (bauhaus)

cuts_13_x

cuts_14_x

cuts_15_x

cuts_16_x

cuts_16a_x

cuts_17_x


cuts_week8

16 10 30

cuts_4_x

cuts_5_x

cuts_6_x

cuts_7_x

cuts_8_x

cuts_9_x

cuts_10_x

cuts_10a_x


folds_cuts_week7

16 10 23

folds_43_x

folds_44_x

folds_45_x (for Munari)

folds_46_x

cuts_1_x

cuts_2_x

cuts_3_x


folds_week6

16 10 16

folds_36_x

folds_37_x

folds_38_x

folds_39_x

folds_40_x

folds_41_x

folds_42_x


folds_week5

16 10 09

folds_29_x

folds_30_x

folds_31_x

folds_32_x

folds_33_x

folds_34_x

folds_35_x


folds_week4

16 10 02

folds_22a_x

folds_22b_x

folds_23_x

folds_24_x

folds_25_x

folds_26_x

folds_27_x

folds_28_x


folds_week3

16 09 25

folds_15_x

folds_16_x

folds_17_x

folds_18_x

folds_19_x

folds_20a_x

folds_20b_x

folds_21_x


folds_week2

16 09 18

folds_8_x

folds_9_x

folds_10_x

folds_11_x

folds_12_x

folds_13_x

folds_14_x


folds_week1

16 09 11

folds_1_x

folds_2_x

folds_3_x

folds_4_x

folds_5_x

folds_6_x

folds_7_x


Accordion-folded book, 3 × 12in. A fifty-foot long timeline with four dates: the date the Earth formed (ca. 4.5 billion years ago), the date of the earliest sign life on Earth (ca. 3.7 billion years ago), the date of the earliest remains of anatomically modern humans (ca. 195,000 years ago), and my birthday.

 
 
 

Typeface created as an example for students in my introduction to type for non-(graphic design) majors course to introduce them to their modular typeface project. Right at the cusp of nonlegibility on purpose, to encourage them to push their concepts as far as they can first before pulling back in revisions. Sketched in Illustrator first, then refined in Fontstruct.

 
 

 
 
 

Ambicons is a card game designed for undergraduate design students.

There are three kinds of cards: symbol cards, concept cards (single or contrasting pair), and modifier cards. After dealing symbol cards to players the dealer turns over a concept card. Players use as many or as few symbols in their hand to represent that concept. A modifier cards might require players to use only one symbol, to incorporate a shared symbol drawn from the unused symbols stack, or to propose two separate solutions. Players then argue for their choice to the dealer, who chooses the best option.

The game rewards imagination, conceptual flexibility, and the ability to articulate reasons for one’s choices. The point is to help students get over proximity biases and rigidity in design problem-solving.


Cornered, a prototype for an original game I created in February/March 2013. Players use the die to set their first pieces, then take turns setting subsequent pieces until one player can no longer make a legal play.